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Magmas, Fluids, and Metals

The vision of the CET in Magmas, Fluids and Metals is to offer a multi-scale integrated research unit focused on understanding the relationships between dynamic igneous systems and mineralisation processes.

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  • 31 August 2014

    Chasing Footprints of an Elusive Quarry

    Remobilization of metals during post-deposition hydrothermal alteration of magmatic sulfide ores has the potential to produce distinct haloes far greater in scale than the source ore body. Recognition of such dispersed signatures may dramatically enlarge the detectable footprin...

    Margaux Le Vaillant

  • 28 February 2014

    A Social License to Undertake Research

    Modern research science is a capital-intensive industry. Scientific resources and agencies are concentrated in wealthy developed nations with the economic and infrastructure base to support such fundamental endeavours. Nature, however, respects no such distinctions - and we com...

    Mark Jessell, Geoff Batt

  • 28 February 2014

    The ongoing search for Hadean crust on Earth

    The familiar concentric layer cake structure of the Earth depicted in textbooks formed within a few hundred million years of the accretion of the planet. This is when the metallic core segregated, the oceans condensed, the atmosphere outgassed and the first rocky crust formed....

    Tony Kemp

Related News

CET PhD Candidate Vikraman Selvaraja wins best student talk at SGA

by Vikraman | Sep 07, 2015
The biennial SGA 2015 conference held in Nancy, France saw a very large CET contingent participating with 30 staff and students delivering presentations and posters including several invited talks. The conference convenes the cutting edge of research in geology applied to mineral deposits and there were many excellent presentations about topics as varied as the future exploration for critical metals in Europe and the developments in the understanding of how lithocaps form above porphyry Cu deposits.
The biennial SGA 2015 conference held in Nancy, France saw a very large CET contingent participating with 30 staff and students delivering presentations and posters including several invited talks. The conference convenes the cutting edge of research in geology applied to mineral deposits and there were many excellent presentations about topics as varied as the future exploration for critical metals in Europe and the developments in the understanding of how lithocaps form above porphyry Cu deposits.
 

The SGA sponsors several student prizes and awards during the duration of the conference, awarded to the 3 best student presentations and 2 best student posters, all of which carry a cash prize of 300US$ and a signed certificate from the SGA executive. This year, CET PhD Candidate, Vikraman Selvaraja won one of the best student presentation awards for his talk titled “Sulfur Sources in the Glenburgh Orogenic Gold Deposit”. This project, part of his PhD, is supported by the Minerals Research Institute of Western Australia (MRIWA), the CSIRO Science and Industry Endowment Fund (SIEF) and the Australian Research Council through Core to Crust Fluid Systems Centre of Excellence (CCFS).

His project discusses the use of the isotopic composition of sulfur in the Archaean which fractionated to different rules than the Proterozoic due to the low oxygen atmosphere in that period as a tool to track the processes resulting in the formation of orogenic gold deposits. The Glenburgh deposit was the case study used in this project in collaboration with Gascoyne Resources, who are strong supporters of this work and it highlighted that the ultimate source of sulfur and metals, including gold, was subducting Neoarchaean carbonaceous shales of the Yilgarn Craton during the Glenburgh Orogeny.