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Magmas, Fluids, and Metals

The vision of the CET in Magmas, Fluids and Metals is to offer a multi-scale integrated research unit focused on understanding the relationships between dynamic igneous systems and mineralisation processes.

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  • 31 August 2014

    Chasing Footprints of an Elusive Quarry

    Remobilization of metals during post-deposition hydrothermal alteration of magmatic sulfide ores has the potential to produce distinct haloes far greater in scale than the source ore body. Recognition of such dispersed signatures may dramatically enlarge the detectable footprin...

    Margaux Le Vaillant

  • 28 February 2014

    A Social License to Undertake Research

    Modern research science is a capital-intensive industry. Scientific resources and agencies are concentrated in wealthy developed nations with the economic and infrastructure base to support such fundamental endeavours. Nature, however, respects no such distinctions - and we com...

    Mark Jessell, Geoff Batt

  • 28 February 2014

    The ongoing search for Hadean crust on Earth

    The familiar concentric layer cake structure of the Earth depicted in textbooks formed within a few hundred million years of the accretion of the planet. This is when the metallic core segregated, the oceans condensed, the atmosphere outgassed and the first rocky crust formed....

    Tony Kemp

Related News

Hottest lava eruption linked to growth of first continents

by User Not Found | Jun 25, 2014
A collaborative research team has discovered an important link between the eruption of Earth's hottest lavas, the location of some of the largest ore deposits and the emergence of the first land masses on the planet - the continents - more than 2500 million years ago. The research team includes researchers from the Centre for Exploration Targeting at The University of Western Australia and Curtin University, which are key nodes of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Core to Crust Fluid Systems, in collaboration with colleagues from CSIRO and the Geological Survey of Western Australia.

A collaborative research team has discovered an important link between the eruption of Earth's hottest lavas, the location of some of the largest ore deposits and the emergence of the first land masses on the planet - the continents - more than 2500 million years ago.

The research team includes researchers from the Centre for Exploration Targeting at The University of Western Australia and Curtin University, which are key nodes of the ARC Centre of Excellence for Core to Crust Fluid Systems, in collaboration with colleagues from CSIRO and the Geological Survey of Western Australia.

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